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As William Shakespeare once posed, “what’s in a name?” And while it’s true that “that which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet,” in the beauty world, names are big business. When there are twenty thousand different peach blushes or bronze eyeshadows on the market, the product’s shade name may end up being a deciding factor in terms of purchase. And one way companies try to entice us to spend our cash? By being outrageous, of course! Here is our rundown of the top nine controversially-named beauty products.

Deep Throat, by Nars

Nars may be the pioneer of outrageously named beauty products – their best-selling product of all time is a blusher called Orgasm. But for the porno connotations and cringe-factor, Deep Throat wins in terms of controversy. For those wondering, it’s a fairly natural, pretty, peachy shade. But that’s probably not what you were thinking about, right?

Underage Red, by Kat Von D

I mean, I could have told you almost immediately this one was a bad idea. This lipstick, which conjures up pretty gross images of sexualisation of teenagers, received a ton of complaints when it launched in Sephora – but is still available to buy, if you’re ok with it. As for the colour, it’s a red, but I’m sure you’d already guessed that.

Bump, by Urban Decay

While you may initially think this name is pretty innocent, what if I told you it’s white. White like, say … cocaine? The shade came to prominence in their (now discontinued) Full Spectrum eyeshadow palette, but still exists as an option for their Razor Sharp Liquid Eyeliner. Weird choice, Urban Decay.

Bordertown, by MAC

MAC’s 2010 collaboration with Rodarte was a PR nightmare. Inspired by Juarez, Mexico, a factory town notorious for rape a violence, it features on particularly wince-inducing product. Bordertown eyeshadow was a gray and red marble, which looked horrifyingly like blood spilled on concrete. MAC apologized for the collection, and ended up donating a portion of their profits from it to relief efforts in Juarez.

Matt Kumar, by TheBalm

The Balm’s Meet Matt(e) Trimony eyeshadow palette featured nine shades, all last-name variations on Matt. So far, pretty weird, but not exactly offensive, right? Well, what if I told you Matt Lin was a yellow colour, Matt Kumar a brick red, and Matt Ahmed a deep brown? Matt Thomas was, of course, a pale pink. This whole thing just seems like an exercise in tone-deafness.

Barely Legal, by Kylie Cosmetics

Barely Legal is already a pretty dodgy name. But when you consider the source – i.e., a highly sexualised teenage girl – it just sets off alarm bells. The blush was launched during Kylie’s relationship with Tyga, which began when she was 17 and he was 25 – yikes. Oh, and it’s like, a nudey peach shade.

Iris I Was Thinner, by OPI

You know what I think? I think there are not enough messages to women telling them to hate their bodies! So thank god OPI managed to squeeze one into a literal nail polish colour. Iris I Was Thinner is a pretty violet shade, but it’s the tones of self-hatred which really make it pop.

Abused, by Jeffree Star

Star is no stranger to controversy, and actually courts them as a part of his “brand.” But this lipstick shade name is extreme, even for him. Want to feel depressed? 1 in 4 women will likely be a victim of domestic abuse in their lifetime. So shall we all just collectively decide we don’t need to spend our hard earned money on this vampy purple shade?

Jizz, by BleachBlack

BleachBlack’s nail polish shade names are always a little out there (Dickweed, anyone?) but this takes the biscuit. Jizz is a translucent, pearly white colour – sorry, sorry, that should be: “Jizz” is a translucent, pearly white colour. It seems to be sold out online, so those wanting the corpse-hand vibe will have to look elsewhere.

If you’re curious about these 6 products and what they look like, scroll through to shop!

Featured images via TheBalm

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