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After the recent outburst of fashion brands taking a stand against using mohair and overall animal products, we can’t help but love this idea that fashion is finally taking a serious look at the ways they can not only make their textiles more eco-friendly, but also stand up for animal welfare, the atmosphere we live in, and much more!

You would actually be surprised at how much of an influence fashion brands can have on controversial yet essential topics. ASOS, for example, the second biggest clothing website in the UK, has pledged to ban silk, mohair, cashmere and feathers from its site from January 2019. PETA, the animal rights organisation, has recognised fashion’s recent and successful shift in spreading the message and quoted:

“The global online retail platform is reflecting a profound shift in public attitudes towards the rearing and killing of animals for fashion,” said Peta UK’s director, Elisa Allen. “Consumers are changing the face of the industry by demanding that designers and retailers offer clothing and accessories that look beautiful without harming animals.”

But ASOS is not alone, other 100s of fast-fashion brands have joined the cause after a video was released by PETA showing the abuse done on angora goats at farms in South America. But this trend is also suggesting that this is a cause close to typical young shoppers’ hearts. This new generation of shoppers are proven to be much more engaged with these important world issues such as animal rights, and are more dedicated to shopping consciously than our parents and grandparents, mostly due to its spread in the media. You might recall our previous piece on sustainable fashion from 2017, and let me tell you, things have even evolved since!

But this shift is also touching the high-fashion retailers as Gucci, Michael Kors and Versace have all pledged to go fur-free this year by joining the Fur Free Alliance. Gucci CEO Marco Bizzari has commented: “our absolute commitment to making sustainability an intrinsic part of our business”.

But this is not all, as earlier this week Harper’s Bazaar have announced fashion’s first Vegan Fashion Week which will take place in February in LA, the city mostly recognised for being the biggest city to ban the use of fur. The four-day event aims to end animal exploitation by educating fashion enthusiasts about the ethical, social and environmental issues surrounding the use of animals in the industry. Veganism is far from only being foot-related, and Rienda is hoping to spread this message.

“I want to ignite conversations and debates within the industry by educating, elevating and drawing connections between our most important values: our respect for human life, animal rights, and the environment,” says Emmanuelle Rienda, Vegan Fashion Week founder and animal rights activist.

Rienda is hoping to take this event to the other fashion forward cities in the aim to make Vegan Fashion Week the standard fashion week in the near future.

Also following the vegan trend, UK-based high street store Marks & Spencer has launched a new range of affordable vegan leather footwear. The new collection was announced on the brand’s Instagram and features a variety of styles for both menswear and womenswear.“Step into Spring with some new season shoes, including our vegan friendly womenswear and menswear styles, available online and in stores,” wrote M&S on their IG post.

Could 2019 honestly be the beginning of the end for animal cruelty in fashion? We would love to think so and can’t help but notice this shift which we’re really excited about here at TWC. Just remember that if you want to shop smartly; always check the labels, research the the brand’s values and most importantly spread the word!

Not sure how to join the cause? Don’t hesitate to ask us any questions in the comments below and we will do our best to help you out or direct you to get as much information as possible!

Shop our animal cruelty free items below to join the movement

Images via Unsplash

PS: If you buy something through our links, TWC may earn an affiliate commission.

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