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Let me ask you a question: who here *loves* coffee? Because let me warn you, I’m not a fan, and the more weird looks I get when I tell my friends that I would rather have a herbal tea or a glass of water than a coffee, the more I wonder about the real benefits of coffee (if there are any).

Coffee is, according to some, “one of the healthiest beverages you could drink” due to different health benefits such as brain stimulation thanks to its caffeine, health due to its high stimulants on the nervous system, and its nutritious and antioxidant ingredients.

Who wouldn’t say yes to lowering their risks of neurological disorders and gaining more vitamins by loading up on the most popular morning drink? However, like with everything else, all these benefits will indeed be good for you only if you drink coffee in moderation. An overdose of coffee can actually cause sleep deprivation, anxiety and even increase your chances of getting heart diseases – so make sure that if you love coffee, you don’t have too much of it.

If you think about it, coffee is almost everyone’s best friend after a good (or should I say heavy) night out or before an important meeting. It wakes you up, tastes and smells good, doesn’t have a lot of calories and can even boost your metabolism. But just remember that if you dress your coffee with masses of cream and sugar, the benefits listed above are barely considered.

“We know that sugar has adverse effects,” said Penny Kris-Etherton, a nutrition professor at Penn State University. “Even if you add sugar and don’t exceed your calorie needs, you’re still negating some of the benefits of coffee because sugar is a negative food ingredient.”

Some of these studies out there have *almost* convinced me to become an avid coffee drinker, especially when I read articles claiming that coffee lovers have a higher chance of living 12-15 years longer than non-coffee drinkers. My issue with coffee however, is the way it makes me feel after the high. After drinking a cup of black coffee before a presentation, feeling this immense rush of confidence and boost, I always seem to feel low and with little to no energy. Which is what started making me think that coffee was actually draining energy out of me in a very short amount of time.

I also realised on the people in my surroundings that coffee addiction was a real thing. Avid coffee drinkers’ bodies have become so immune to the substance that their body and minds have stopped reacting to the boost of energy that (personally) gets me super wired and energised, and they also seem to show obvious traits of withdrawals if they don’t have their usual 3-5 coffees a day, which definitely doesn’t seem healthy to me.

All this to say that I am not one of these coffee lovers but find the world of coffee captivating, especially in the UK, a place that stereotypically enjoys a cup of tea. In London alone, we noticed an uptrend in trendy coffee shops and internationally roasted coffee, ultimately identified as the “third wave coffee movement“.

“We have moved from a nation of tea drinkers and occasional instant coffee drinkers to a nation of coffee lovers and even coffee geeks,” says Jeffrey Young, the chairman of the Allegra Foundation food organisation behind UK Coffee Week

Bottom line is that if you are addicted to coffee, you shouldn’t freak out or stop right away, but you should watch your consumption levels. With the amount of studies supporting the benefits of coffee when consumed in a reasonable amount, it’s pretty obvious that there are no reasons why you should erase the drink from your life, but make sure you are taking it in moderation because at the end of the day, although coffee is considered a healthy drink, it can still keep you up at night and increase your anxiety levels.

Shop our coffee-lover inspired selection below!

Featured images via  Unsplash

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